A Student and Professor Using a Machine.

CNC Manufacturing Technology

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The Anoka Technical College CNC Design & Manufacturing Technology Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree and diploma programs are designed to meet our student's career goals. The programs combine technical education with general education to provide graduates with the precise skills necessary for success in manufacturing.

Learningoptions Blk

Day, evening and part-time options

Handsoneducation Blk

Hands-on training from industry experts

Advancement Blk

High growth rate compared to other careers in Minnesota

Potential Jobs:

  • Machinist
  • Machine Operator
  • Advanced Manufacturing Technician

Salary Information:
Median Wage: $32.52 per hour
Top Earners: $40.36 per hour

Information provided is for Minnesota. See current data at careerwise.minnstate.edu.

What You'll Learn

Our students learn how to:

  • Write and edit CNC programs
  • Perform complex setups
  • Basic troubleshooting of machine problems
  • Cycle time reduction practices
  • Fixture design and building
  • Recognize areas for process improvements

They are trained to safely operate:

  • Manual lathes
  • Drills
  • Mills
  • Grinders
  • CNC mills
  • CNC lathes
  • CNC wire
  • EDM
  • CNC sinker
  • EDM Coordinate measuring machine
  • CAD/CAM 4 & 5 axis

Program Details

Program Details (pdf)

The CNC Design & Manufacturing Technology Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree is a 69-credit program that includes technical and general education components to provide the skills for trade entry plus the possibility to pursue a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree with cooperating colleges and universities.

The CNC Design and Manufacturing Technology degree program prepares people to write and edit CNC programs, perform complex setups, basic troubleshooting of machine problems, cycle time reduction practices, fixture design and building, recognize areas of process improvements and operate the following equipment: manual lathes, grills mills, grinders, CNC programming, CNC mills, CNC lathes, coordinate measuring machine, CAD/CAM and 4&5 axis CNC mills.

Graduates are also skilled in the areas of basic troubleshooting of machine problems, cycle time reduction practices, fixture design and building, blueprint reading GD&T, statistical process control, lean manufacturing, math, inspection and the correct sequence of operation required. Graduates may also be skilled in the areas of tool and cutter, CNC wire EDM and CNC sinker EDM and CNC parametric programming depending on elective taken.

  1. The student will demonstrate machine skills and practices consistent with the manufacturing industry.
  2. Exhibit safety principles and practices in a manufacturing environment.
  3. Communicate effective use of machine shop theory and process terminology.
  4. Work efficiently as a member in a machine shop environment to manage time and meet project deadlines.
  5. Work effectively as a member of a team while accepting constructive criticism.

The machinist is a skilled metal worker who produces metal parts by using machine tools and hand tools. Training and experience enable the machinist to plan and carry through all the operations needed to turn out a finished machine product and to switch readily from one kind of product to another. The machinist’s background and knowledge enables him/her to turn a block of metal into an intricate, precise part.

All options are an art as well as a skill, and are considered to be demanding occupations. There is a great variety in the construction of dies and molds, depending on the design of a part, the type of materials used, the ingenuity of the designer, and the knowledge and skill of the die and mold maker, who must machine intricate components of various tooling to tolerances expressed in fractions of one-thousandths of an inch.

Employees in this position are expected to write and edit CNC programs, perform complex setups, basic troubleshooting of machine problems, cycle time reduction practices, fixture design  and building and recognize areas for process improvements on manual lathes, drills, mills, grinders, CNC mills, CNC lathes, CNC wire EDM and CNC sinker EDM, coordinate measuring machine, and CAD/CAM. Employees are also expected to invoke lean manufacturing process and practices.

Wage information is available from the Minnesota Department of Education and the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development.

Take a self-guided virtual tour of our campus to see what it's like to be a student at Anoka Tech. View program labs, common student spaces, campus offices and more. 

Virtual Tour

Some courses in this program may require a prerequisite. Please see course descriptions for more details.

MnTC General Education Requirements

This program requires completion of the following fifteen credits of general education from at least three goal areas of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC). Refer to the MnTC course list for elective courses:

Course Number Course Title Credits
ENGL 1107  Composition I (Goal 1&2) 4
MATH 1650  College Trigonometry (Goal 4) 3
MnTC Electives   8

Program Sequence

First Semester 16
MACH 1101 Milling 4
MACH 1106 Lathe 3
MACH 1121 Metrology
2
MACH 1132 Blueprint Reading
3
MACH 1140 CAD I 1
MATH 1650 College Trigonometry
3
 Second Semester 18
MACH 1200 Advanced Machining
3
MACH 1220 Grinding
2
MACH 1231 Blueprint Design/CAD II
1
MACH 1240 Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing
3
MACH 1251 CNC Machining 3
MACH 1261 CNC Programming I 3
MACH 1275 Quality Standard 1
MnTC Elective   2
 Third Semester  16
MACH 2310 CNC Milling
3
MACH 2320 CNC Turning
3
MACH 2331 CAM
1
MACH 2340 CNC Programming II
2
MACH 2351 Mold/Die Making Theory 3
MACH 2360 Fixture and Tooling 4
 Fourth Semester 19
ENGL 1107 Composition I 4
MACH 2451 CNC Design and Manufacture
3
MACH 2462 Multi-Axis Milling
3
MACH 2472 Multi-Axis Turning
3
MnTC Electives   6

Students can choose to complete the Machine Trade programs part-time. Part-time students will take longer to complete their program than students who follow the full-time sequence listed. Because every course may not be offered each semester with both day and evening options, it is important for part-time students to reach out to their faculty advisors for help in planning their long-term, part-time course sequence.

Below, new machine trades students can find first semester part-time course options. After the first semester, work with your faculty advisors to plan future semesters.

Note: In each option, you will see a choice of MACH 1171 Math for Machinists or MATH 1650 College Trigonometry. Diploma students are required to take MACH 1171 and AAS degree students are required to take MATH 1650.

First Semester Course Options

First semester part-time course options (choose option 1, 2, or 3): 

Option 1: All Lecture Courses

MACH 1171 or MATH 1650 - Math for Machinist or College Trigonometry

MACH 1132 - Blueprint Reading

MACH 1121 - Metrology

MACH 1140 - CAD 1

Option 2: Lecture Courses + Milling Lab

MACH 1171 or MATH 1650 - Math for Machinist or College Trigonometry

MACH 1132 - Blueprint Reading

MACH 1121 - Metrology

MACH 1140 - CAD 1

MACH 1101 - Milling 

Option 3: Lecture Courses + Lathe

MACH 1171 or MATH 1650 - Math for Machinist or College Trigonometry

MACH 1132 - Blueprint Reading

MACH 1121 - Metrology

MACH 1140 - CAD 1

MACH 1106 - Lathe

View Course Schedule

Developmental Courses

Diploma students: MACH 1171 Math for Machinists requires an Arithmetic ACCUPLACER score of 265. Students who do not meet any of the prerequisites must take the developmental course MATH 0801 Basic Math in their first semester and
then MACH 1171 in their second semester.

AAS degree students: MATH 1650 College Trigonometry requires an Advanced Algebra Functions ACCUPLACER score of 250. Students who do not meet any of the prerequisites must take the appropriate developmental math course(s) (MATH 0801 Basic Math and/or MATH 0900 Elementary Algebra) as determined by the placement chart before taking MATH 1650.

Students must earn a cumulative 2.0 GPA or higher to be eligible for graduation from this program.

Faculty

Brendon Paulson
Brendon Paulson
bpaulson@sysbnews.com
Jesse Oldenburg
Jesse Oldenburg
JOldenburg@sysbnews.com
Matthew Rogers
Matthew Rogers
MRogers@sysbnews.com
Jerry Showalter
Jerry Showalter
JShowalter@sysbnews.com

Enrollment Services
EnrollmentServices@sysbnews.com
763-576-7710

Current Students

register for classes

On the first day of class all you will need is a pair of safety glasses.

We will review tools in the first few days and help you understand where better quality tools are needed. Anoka Tech also partners with several vendors to provide students with discounted tools.

Tools List

The Anoka Technical College CNC Design & Manufacturing Technology Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree and diploma programs are designed to meet our student's career goals. The programs combine technical education with general education to provide graduates with the precise skills necessary for success in manufacturing.
Learningoptions Blk

Day, evening and part-time options

Handsoneducation Blk

Hands-on training from industry experts

Advancement Blk

High growth rate compared to other careers in Minnesota

Potential Jobs:

  • Machinist
  • Machine Operator
  • Advanced Manufacturing Technician

Salary Information:
Median Wage: $32.52 per hour
Top Earners: $40.36 per hour

Information provided is for Minnesota. See current data at careerwise.minnstate.edu.

Program Details

Program Details (pdf)

The Anoka Technical College Advanced CNC Machine Technology diploma is a 64-credit program that includes technical education components. The program prepares students to write and edit CNC programs, perform complex setups, basic troubleshooting of machine problems, cycle time reduction practices, fixture design and building, recognize areas for process improvements and operate the following equipment: manual lathes, drills, mills, grinders, CNC mills, CNC lathes, CNC wire EDM and CNC sinker EDM, coordinate measuring machine, CAD/CAM and 4&5 axis CNC mills.

Program graduates are skilled in the areas of CNC programming, parametric programming, basic troubleshooting of machine problems, cycle time reduction practices, fixture design and building, blueprint reading, GD&T, statistical process control, lean manufacturing, math, inspection and the correct sequence of operation required.

Those employed in this position are expected to write and edit CNC programs, perform complex setups, basic troubleshoot of machine problems, cycle time reduction practices, fixture design and building and recognize areas for process improvements on manual lathes, drills, mills, grinders, CNC mills, CNC lathes, CNC wire EDM and CNC sinker EDM, coordinate measuring machine and CAD/CAM. Employees are also expected to invoke lean manufacturing process and practices.

The CNC Manufacturing Technology program provides the skills for trade entry plus the possibility to pursue a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree with cooperating colleges and universities.

  1. Write and edit CNC programs
  2. Perform complex setups
  3. Basic troubleshooting of machine problems
  4. Cycle time reduction practices
  5. Fixture design and building
  6. Recognize areas for process improvements

The machinist is a skilled metal worker who produces metal parts by using machine tools and hand tools. Training and experience enable the machinist to plan and carry through all the operations needed to turn out a finished machine product and to switch readily from one kind of product to another. The machinist’s background and knowledge enables him/her to turn a block of metal into an intricate, precise part.

All options are an art as well as a skill, and are considered to be demanding occupations. There is a great variety in the construction of dies and molds, depending on the design of a part, the type of materials used, the ingenuity of the designer, and the knowledge and skill of the die and mold maker, who must machine intricate components of various tooling to tolerances expressed in fractions of one-thousandths of an inch.

Employees in this position are expected to write and edit CNC programs, perform complex setups, basic troubleshooting of machine problems, cycle time reduction practices, fixture design  and building and recognize areas for process improvements on manual lathes, drills, mills, grinders, CNC mills, CNC lathes, CNC wire EDM and CNC sinker EDM, coordinate measuring machine, and CAD/CAM. Employees are also expected to invoke lean manufacturing process and practices.

Wage information is available from the Minnesota Department of Education and the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development.

Take a self-guided virtual tour of our campus to see what it's like to be a student at Anoka Tech. View program labs, common student spaces, campus offices and more. 

Virtual Tour

Some courses in this program may require a prerequisite. Please see course descriptions for more details.

Program Sequence

First Semester 16
 MACH 1101  Milling 4
 MACH 1106  Lathe 3
 MACH 1121  Metrology
2
 MACH 1132  Blueprint Reading
3
 MACH 1140  CAD I 1
 MACH 1171  Math for Machinist
3
 OR    
 MATH  College Trigonometry 3
 Second Semester 16
 MACH 1200  Advanced Machining
3
 MACH 1220  Grinding
2
 MACH 1231  Blueprint Reading/CAD II
1
 MACH 1240  Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing
3
 MACH 1251  CNC Machining 3
 MACH 1261  CNC Programming I 3
 MACH 1275 Quality Standard 1
 Third Semester 16
 MACH 2310  CNC Milling
3
 MACH 2320  CNC Turning
3
 MACH 2331  CAM
1
 MACH 2340  CNC Programming II
2
 MACH 2351  Mold/Die Making Theory 3
 MACH 2360  Fixture and Tooling 4
 Fourth Semester 16
 MACH 2411  Tool and Cutter Grinding 2
 MACH 2420  EDM Machining 2
 MACH 2435 Swiss Machining 2
 MACH 2440  CNC Programming III
1
 MACH 2451  CNC Design and Manufacturing 3
 MACH 2462  Multi-Axis Milling
3
 MACH 2471  Multi-Axis Turning
 3 

Students can choose to complete the Machine Trade programs part-time. Part-time students will take longer to complete their program than students who follow the full-time sequence listed. Because every course may not be offered each semester with both day and evening options, it is important for part-time students to reach out to their faculty advisors for help in planning their long-term, part-time course sequence.

Below, new machine trades students can find first semester part-time course options. After the first semester, work with your faculty advisors to plan future semesters.

Note: In each option, you will see a choice of MACH 1171 Math for Machinists or MATH 1650 College Trigonometry. Diploma students are required to take MACH 1171 and AAS degree students are required to take MATH 1650.

First Semester Course Options

First semester part-time course options (choose option 1, 2, or 3): 

Option 1: All Lecture Courses

MACH 1171 or MATH 1650 - Math for Machinist or College Trigonometry

MACH 1132 - Blueprint Reading

MACH 1121 - Metrology

MACH 1140 - CAD 1

Option 2: Lecture Courses + Milling Lab

MACH 1171 or MATH 1650 - Math for Machinist or College Trigonometry

MACH 1132 - Blueprint Reading

MACH 1121 - Metrology

MACH 1140 - CAD 1

MACH 1101 - Milling 

Option 3: Lecture Courses + Lathe

MACH 1171 or MATH 1650 - Math for Machinist or College Trigonometry

MACH 1132 - Blueprint Reading

MACH 1121 - Metrology

MACH 1140 - CAD 1

MACH 1106 - Lathe

View Course Schedule

Developmental Courses

Diploma students: MACH 1171 Math for Machinists requires an Arithmetic ACCUPLACER score of 265. Students who do not meet any of the prerequisites must take the developmental course MATH 0801 Basic Math in their first semester and
then MACH 1171 in their second semester.

AAS degree students: MATH 1650 College Trigonometry requires an Advanced Algebra Functions ACCUPLACER score of 250. Students who do not meet any of the prerequisites must take the appropriate developmental math course(s) (MATH 0801 Basic Math and/or MATH 0900 Elementary Algebra) as determined by the placement chart before taking MATH 1650.

Students must earn a cumulative 2.0 GPA or higher to be eligible for graduation from this program.

Faculty

Brendon Paulson
Brendon Paulson
bpaulson@sysbnews.com
Jesse Oldenburg
Jesse Oldenburg
JOldenburg@sysbnews.com
Matthew Rogers
Matthew Rogers
MRogers@sysbnews.com
Jerry Showalter
Jerry Showalter
JShowalter@sysbnews.com

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